Peace Requires Anarchy

About

Me

My name is William Kiely. I’m from New Hampshire.

I intend to write a brief How I Became a Voluntaryist essay eventually. (Update 2+ years later: My Intellectual Journey to Libertarian Anarchism)

Contact

Facebook: wjkiely https://www.facebook.com/wjkiely

YouTube:  PeaceRequiresAnarchy http://www.youtube.com/PeaceRequiresAnarchy

Twitter:  @PeaceReqAnarchy https://twitter.com/PeaceReqAnarchy

Reddit: As of late 2014 I’m using /u/WilliamKiely and retiring /u/PeaceRequiresAnarchy

Email:  PeaceRequiresAnarchy – at – gmail.com

The Blog

Peace Requires Anarchy is a blog created to advocate peace in all situations, at all times, without exception and to educate people about the violent nature of many widely accepted acts, such as the act of taxing someone or the act of enforcing so-called “intellectual property” rights against someone.

At first this may sound rather dull, but once you realize that the vast majority of people in today’s world do not consistently support peace, I think it’s likely that you will become just as passionate about this cause as I am.

In fact, it may be the case that you will realize that many of your own beliefs are inconsistent with peace. This may inspire you not only to change your own views, but also to passionately advocate peace to others as well.

The purpose of this blog is thus to enlighten people about the various beliefs that people hold that are inconsistent with peace and to advocate that they change these beliefs to favor peace.

Peace

What does it mean to “advocate peace”? In his long essay From Dictatorship to Democracy Gene Sharp writes:

What kind of peace?

If dictators and democrats are to talk about peace at all, extremely clear thinking is needed because of the dangers involved. Not everyone who uses the word “peace” wants peace with freedom and justice. Submission to cruel oppression and passive acquiescence to ruthless dictators who have perpetrated atrocities on hundreds of thousands of people is no real peace. Hitler often called for peace, by which he meant submission to his will. A dictators’ peace is often no more than the peace of the prison or of the grave. [page 14]

A society in a state or condition of absolute peace is a just society in which everybody is free and nobody commits any acts of aggression.

To advocate peace is to advocate non-aggression. Advocating non-aggression means opposing all acts of aggression.

Acts of aggression are defined as violations of legitimate libertarian property rights, where property rights are determined by the libertarian system of self-ownership and homesteading.

An act of aggression is an initiation of the use or threat of physical force or violence against the person or property of another. Examples of acts of aggression include murder, theft, extortion, rape and assault.

Note that the libertarian believes all acts of aggression are unjust. I am a libertarian.

The libertarian finds that many of the unjust aggressive acts that most people are not aware are aggressive are often acts committed by governments.

Roderick Long, in An Open Letter to the Peace Movement, points out that all governments are guilty of employing aggression in at least two ways:

To the extent that government initiates force against its people – and every government qua government must do so, since a government that maintained neither coercive taxation nor a coercive territorial monopoly of authority would no longer be a government, but something a good deal more wholesome – every government is waging a war of aggression against its own people. A consistent peace activist must be an anarchist.

Rather than say that governments maintain “a coercive territorial monopoly of authority,” Stephan Kinsella, in his article What It Means To Be an Anarcho-Capitalist, makes much the same point in a different way:

States always tax their citizens, which is a form of aggression. They always outlaw competing defense agencies, which also amounts to aggression.

Roderick Long’s essay Equality: The Unknown Ideal, does a good job describing the sort of Lockean equality of authority that libertarians favor.

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2 thoughts on “About

  1. Good stuff! I look forward to following you.

  2. Nice to find your page, you may find the top 2 posts on my page valuable too. Peace.

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